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Fig. 2 | Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation

Fig. 2

From: Reducing the metabolic energy of walking and running using an unpowered hip exoskeleton

Fig. 2

Exoskeleton components and working process of the exoskeleton. A Back view of the exoskeleton. We change the length of d to adjust the width of the two waist parts for best-fit participants. B Right view of the exoskeleton. The waist part and thigh connecting rods were connected using two rotary joints with plain bearing in series, allowing the adduction/abduction and flexion/extension of the hip joint. C and D Working process of the exoskeleton. The assistance interval is in accordance with the hip joint negative and positive mechanical power during walking and running. In the walking and running condition, the assistance started at nearly 10 degrees of hip flexion position. During the negative power period of the hip joint, the spring stores energy with the hip extension to its maximum extension position. During the positive power period of the hip joint, the spring releases the stored energy to assist hip flexion to 10 degrees of hip flexion position

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