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Table 1 Participant details

From: It’s not about the capture, it’s about what we can learn”: a qualitative study of experts’ opinions and experiences regarding the use of wearable sensors to measure gait and physical activity

Variable  
Gender  
 Male (n = ; %) 7 (35.0%)
 Female (n = ; %) 13 (65.0%)
Professional role  
Academic  
Clinical academic 2 (10.0%)
Post-doctoral researcher 3 (15.0%)
Professor 7 (35.0%)
Researchera 5 (25.0%)
Clinician (full-time) 1 (5.0%)
Industry based 2 (10.0%)
Country of work  
 Belgium 1 (5.0%)
 Germany 2 (10.0%)
 Ireland 2 (10.0%)
 Israel 1 (5.0%)
 Italy 1 (5.0%)
 Norway 3 (15.0%)
 Spain 2 (10.0%)
 Switzerland 1 (5.0%)
 United Kingdom 7 (35.0%)
 Years in research (median, IQR; min–max) 11.5 (10.5; 4–31)
 Years experience with wearable devices (median, IQR; min–max) 9.0 (7.0; 1–20)
Background area of study (prior to current role)  
 Biomedical science 2 (10.0%)
 Computer science 1 (5.0%)
 Doctor 4 (20.0%)
 Engineering 3 (15.0%)
 Information technology 1 (5.0%)
 Physiology and/or sport and movement science 4 (20.0%)
 Physiotherapy 5 (25.0%)
A list of devices/manufacturers that researchers had experience withb
 Actibelt; Activpal; Actigraph; Axivity; Biovotion; GaitUp; Hexoskin; Fitbit; Mc10; McRoberts; Movisense; Noraxon; Philips; SenseEye; Sensewear; Shimmer; Strive; Spire, Withings  
  1. aResearcher denotes senior researchers, project co-ordinators, and/or research associates; blist is not exhaustive as not all researchers could remember all devices they had used, therefore devices are listed by name only and not how many researchers mentioned them, so as to avoid any suggestion of device popularity